Tag

sesame paste

Autumn Food, Blog, Winter Food

Vegan Ramen With A Creamy Tofu & Miso Sauce


Ramen written in Japanese: 拉麺, ラーメン or らーめん

Arriving  in Japan in the late 19th or early 20th Century
from China ramen has become one of the most popular dishes not only across Japan but the world.
The first Japanese restaurant to serve up a bowl of noodles similar to today’s ramen was Yowaken 養和軒 in 1884, but it wasn’t until 1910 that Japan had its first ramen shop called Rairaiken 来々軒 in Asakura, Tokyo.
There is something comforting about a bowl of ramen, even if it didn’t originate from Japan, Japan have made it their own and given ramen it’s on Japanese culture. Nearly every region in Japan seams to have their own version. Different areas, cities, and even shops have their own twist on ramen. From different broths like shio (salt ramen) shoyu (soy sauce), miso, milk or curry. Then there are straight or curly noodles of all different thickness.
Loved not only by salarymen who have no time to prepare their own meals but who are looking for something quick hot and filling, but also by students and those looking for a quick cheap, and delicious, meal on the go.
The appetite for ramen saw even a ramen museum open in Yokohama in 1994.
So when Hikari Miso and parent company Dragonfly Tofu asked if I could come up with a tofu ramen recipe just for them I wondered what I could do to make things different to the other tofu ramen recipes found across Japan and ones that come up on the internet when you search “tofu ramen”. I also wanted it to be easy, relatively cheap and quick to make. You may have some of the ingredients already in your store cupboard and apart from the tofu if you do have to buy the ingredients you will have lots left over to use over and over again.

I took my inspiration from ramen created in Hokkaido using miso paste as a seasoning. Hikari miso has been crafted over four generations in Nagano Japan, where the water air and cool climate make the perfect environment for making miso. The ramen I have created has a robust flavour as the miso paste is creamy and tangy, and instead of using tofu as a topping I decided to use it with the miso to make a sauce. The dish feels so decadent but is so quick and simple to make.

Using the true authentic gently coagulated soft Shizenno Megumi Organic Tofu known as “ kinughosi” in Japan, it lends itself well to making the perfect rich sauces as well as using it for desserts, smoothies or just simply cut up into cubes and added to miso soups.

How to make my Ramen with a creamy tofu & miso sauce.

You will need: (serves two)

x1 pack of Shizenno Megumi “natures best” organic soft tofu
x1 tablespoon of Shiro Nerigoma  (white sesame paste)
x1 tablespoon of Hikari miso organic white miso
x1 tablespoon of light soy sauce (known as Usukuchi)
x1 teaspoon of brown rice vinegar
x1 teaspoon of mirin
x1 teaspoon of toasted sesame oil
Add all the above ingredients to a blender and blend until smooth thick and creamy. Then pour into a saucepan.
You will also need a variety of toppings prepped in advance. This could be a combination of steamed vegetables bean sprouts, komatsuna or chingensai (bok choy), hakusai (Chinese cabbage), grilled lotus root and shiitake, sliced kabocha roasted or steamed, sliced red onion, sliced negi (green onion), tinned sweetcorn, watercress, maybe some roasted bell peppers, whatever you fancy.
Once you have prepped your toppings things come together quickly so you could do this in advance.
Put your ramen noodles of choice in a pan of boiling water (check to make sure they are vegan.)  I recommend samurai ramen. Some may come with a sauce you will not need to use this so save it for another time. I also like ohsawa ramen which I often bring back from Japan.
Get your serving bowls ready.
Many ramen broths in Hokkaido have milk so in true Hokkaido style add soy milk to your tofu sauce. Add as much as you like to make the sauce the consistency you want. Start to gently heat your sauce do not let it boil.
Drain your ramen noodles and add to your serving bowls. When your sauce is nice and hot pour over your sauce and quickly add your toppings so that it’s all still nice and hot when you serve it. I like to add a few drops of chilli oil, some chilli threads known as Ito togarishi and a scatter of sesame seeds.
Happy Slurping.
Autumn Food, Blog, Spring Food, Summer Food, Winter Food

Tofu Taco Crumble introducing “Shizenno Megumi Tofu”

Meet Shunzo Horikawa managing director of Shizenno Megumi Tofu.

Shunzo arrived in the U.K. in April 2022 from the parent company Hikari Miso (you may been using this lovely organic miso already) which they had been making since 1936. Born in Kawasaki his first job out of university was working for House Foods America one of the largest Tofu manufacturers in the world and in 2019 joined Hikari Miso Co Ltd. Dragonfly Foods Tofu original brand since 1984 was bought by Hikari Miso in 2015 and decided to upscale production capacity by shipping massive equipment made in Japan and set up a new purpose built facility for making tofu in Devon in 2017.

Shunzo started to travel back and forth from Japan to Devon to help with supporting the production of tofu. In 2022 Shunzo moved to Devon with his family to start a new challenge with the Dragonfly team. “Shizenno Megumi” means natures best, the brand was started to follow the traditional style of tofu making in Japan. Working as a parent company with Dragonfly Foods in Devon they are BRC A+ soil association approved. Using Nigari as a coagulant the tofu requires intensive control to coagulate the rich soymilk. Nigari naturally promotes umami and sweetness, Nigari derived from the Japanese word for “bitter” is a product created through harvesting sea salt and letting the water evaporate. Nigari contains a high concentration of minerals such as magnesium, potassium, calcium, iron, copper, zinc, selenium and chlorines. The delicate soft tofu is hand crafted in Devon using Japanese techniques by a small group of passionate members bringing traditionally made Japanese style tofu to the U.K.

I was so humbled when I was approached by Shunzo who asked me to try out their range of Shizenno Megumi tofu. The range is firm, super firm and soft tofu. So what can we use each tofu for you might wonder. The soft tofu is wonderful cut into cubes and used in miso soup, Shunzo even recommends using it in smoothies and desserts. The super firm is good for dishes like a grilled sandwich or anything that might require the tofu to keep its shape in frying or sautéing.
I have decided to use the firm tofu to bring you a versatile recipe for a kind of taco style vegan mince that can be used in so many ways.
Let’s get started using Shizenno Megumi tofu !

Tofu Taco Mince

You will need:

x1 pack of Shizenno Megumi firm tofu (open the pack drain the water and wrap in a cloth or kitchen towel top with a weight and leave for an hour to drain) I use my heavy cast iron Japanese teapot lol.

You will also need:
1 cup of walnuts pulsed in a food processor to fine crumbs.

Spices: x1 teaspoon of onion powder, 1/2 teaspoon of garlic powder, 1/2 teaspoon of smoked paprika, x1 teaspoon of mixed herbs, x1 teaspoons of cayenne pepper.

x1 tablespoon of nutritional yeast

x1 tablespoon of toasted sesame oil

x2 tablespoons of tamari or soysauce

x2 tablespoons of tomato purée

x1 tablespoon of miso paste

A dash of chilli oil and vegan Worcestershire sauce

Method:

Unwrap the tofu, place into a bowl and mash it with a fork.
Add the pulsed walnuts and the rest of the ingredients and give it all a good mix.

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and spread out the mixture.
Place in a preheated moderate oven and bake for 30 minutes, then take the baking sheet out of the oven and give the tofu mixture a good mix round and spread it back out again. Place the tray back in the oven for 10 minutes and repeat again until all the mixture is dried out. Now your tofu taco mixture is ready to use.

How to use:

The tofu mixture can be used in a multitude of ways but keeping things Japanese here are three ways you can use it.

The first is soboro don そぼろ丼.
This meal is classed as Japanese comfort food. Normally beef Mince and scrambled eggs on top of fluffy rice. This is another perfect way to use the soft tofu, as you can use this to make the scrambled eggs part, to make it a vegan meal. Like before drain and wrap the soft tofu but do not weight it. Leave it to stand for 30 minutes to drain then add to a bowl and mash it with a fork, add x1 teaspoon of turmeric, x1 tablespoon of nutritional yeast and x1 teaspoon of ground kala namak black salt (this will give it a slight egg flavour). Give it all a mix and lightly scramble it in a frying pan. Just add a flavourless oil like coconut oil to the pan then wipe clean so the egg mixture is not sitting in oil. Cook some Japanese rice. You will have made enough tofu taco mince for many meals, I like to section mine out into sealable containers and freeze it as needed. Spoon some rice into a bowl and top one half of the rice with warmed through tofu taco mince and the other  half scrambled tofu. It is customary to add green vegetables like peas or beans in the middle.

Second meal idea is of course taco rice

(takoraisu) タコライス.

Taco rice is a Japanese fusion meal from Okinawa, normally consisting of taco ground beef on a bed of rice with lettuce, tomato and cheese. It owes its existence to the military presence in Okinawa in the 1960’s. Nowadays it’s a firm Japanese favourite. I have already got a few different recipes for taco rice on here so you could also check those recipes. This one was just lettuce rice and the taco mince on top. I made a delicious salsa for this one using roasted tomatillos, blistered pardon peppers and sliced myoga ginger.

Tomatillos, padron pepper and myoga salsa:

I had just recently acquired some tomatillos that come wrapped in a papery inedible husk which you must remove first.

Wash them and slice into halves or quarters depending on the size. Toss lightly in olive oil and a little sprinkle of salt and roast in the oven.

While that’s being done toss some padron peppers in a little olive oil and blister them on high heat in a pan.

When they are done leave to cool. Slice one small red onion and one bulb of myoga ginger and add to a bowl.  Myoga ginger can be found in some Asian super markets I have seen it in Ichiba in London and I buy mine from a Japanese store called Natural Natural in London. Myoga ginger doesn’t taste like ginger and is an edible flower bud. Add to this the juice of half a lime and 1/4 teaspoon of salt. Give it a mix and let it rest. When your tomatillos are ready leave to cool and chop finely your padron peppers then add both into the bowl with the onion and myoga. Finally add some chopped coriander and give it all a final stir.

Assemble your taco rice and add your salsa on top.

The final way I recommend using your tofu taco mince is with a creamy and flavourful Tantanmen ramen 坦々麺.

You will need 1 cup of shiitake dashi (leave a a dried shiitake in water over night)

First you will need to make goma dare this is the base of your sauce.

Add to a bowl x1 tablespoon of Neri goma (white sesame paste) if you have not got this you can use tahini. To this x1 tablespoon of white miso paste. Then add x1 tablespoon of light soy sauce, x1 teaspoon of brown rice vinegar, x1 teaspoon of chilli oil and x1 teaspoon of mirin.
Give it all a good whisk and put aside.


You will also need a packet of vegan ramen and toppings.

My toppings were vegan tofu taco mince, steamed bean sprouts, chingensai (pakchoy), Hokusai (Chinese cabbage), sweet corn, pea shoots, sliced pickles, lotus root, padron peppers and chilli threads. Choose what toppings you like and prepare these in advance.
When you’re ready start to cook your ramen. Add to a pan 1 and a 1/2 cups of soy milk 1 cup of shiitake dashi and 1/2 a cup of water. Add your goma dare mixture and start to heat it gently stirring to combine.

When your ramen is ready drain and divide into two bowls and pour over your sesame soy milk. Drizzle with extra chilli oil for heat. Add your toppings and you’re done.

Just on a final note you can add extra things accordingly to your tofu taco mince depending on what you’re making. You could add extra tomato purée or tomato passata to make a bolognaise sauce for pasta or maybe  sautéed onions chopped mushrooms or peppers.

And now a treat for you Shunzo has very kindly given me an exclusive discount code for you to use on their website to purchase their delicious tofu. Just head over to www.dragonflyfoods.com click shop choose your items and put them in your cart, check out and input the promo code TOKYOPONY20 under coupon code on the delivery and payment section. This will take 20% off your bill. This offer will run until the 11th of August 2023.
Have fun in the kitchen.

Summer Food

Brown Rice Amazake Ice Cream with Kinako

The weather is starting to heat up and what could be more enjoyable on a hot summers day than a delicious ice cream. Well this one is not only dairy free but is made with brown rice amazake. I’m using the one from Clearspring which you can find from health stores or on line.

The amazake is made in Japan by using time-honoured production processes and just three organic ingredients, water, whole grains and salt. A koji culture converts the carbohydrates from the whole grains into simple sugars to make it naturally sweet and creamy.
I was inspired by ohsawa Japan cooking school to make this ice cream it’s so simple and delicious and takes little effort.

You will need :

x1 jar of brown rice amazake

x2 tablespoons of kinako (soy bean flour) plus more for sprinkling on your final ice cream to serve.

x2 teaspoons of white sesame paste (or tahini)

x2 tablespoons of good quality soy milk (I like bonsoy)

a pinch of salt

x2 teaspoons of toasted sesame oil

Method:

Push the amazake through a fine sieve to collect the grains ( I used my misokoshi ) I have talked about this a few times for making miso soup ( available to buy from www.hatsukoi.co.uk) Using this will ensure you have a nice smooth texture. Do not throw the grains they are nice to add to a morning porridge or over night oats.

Add your amazake to a bowl and add everything else except the toasted sesame oil. Give everything a mix then finally whisk in the oil until it’s well combined.

Add your mixture to a container and chill well in the fridge.

Take it out to soften slightly before serving. Dust with kinako powder.

Why not pour over some kuromitsu to make it extra special.
Kuromitsu is a Japanese sugar syrup similar in taste to molasses. It’s typically made from unrefined kokuto and is an ingredient you will find as an accompaniment to many Japanese summer desserts like Anmitsu, Warabi Mochi and Kuzukiri.

It is made by extracting the juice of fresh sugar cane and crystallising it. It contains minerals like potassium and iron that are removed normally during refining. This sugar is mostly made in Okinawa and the people there refer to it as “life medicine” which is food that makes you feel good. You can buy kokuto in sugar granules or cube form. Kokuto is easily bought on line.

To make Kuromitsu for this dessert:

25g or 2 tablespoons of kokuto

25g of unrefined sugar

25ml water

Method:

Boil up in a pan once boiling reduce the heat to a simmer until it thickens and dissolved (takes just a few minutes).


Pour into a small jug or bowl for pouring and set aside to cool. You may find it goes very thick just add a little hot water and stir to desired consistency. You can keep any left over in a jar in the fridge to use next time.

Let’s enjoy summer with Japanese vegan food