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Kamado-san Donabe Rice Cooker by Nagatani-en & Onigiri

Kama do-san Donabe Rice Cooker by Nagatani-en

長谷園のかまどさん
 
Nagatani-en is in Iga city of Mie prefecture. It opened its kiln in 1832. Iga-yaki pottery came to fame due to its use of clay that is said to have originated from Lake Biwa.
The  bottom of the donabe rice cooker Kamado-san is especially thick keeping the heat inside. Its glaze enables the pot to heat every grain of rice so it becomes sweet, fluffy, and sticky. Kamado-san has a double lid, an inner lid and outer lid. This double lid plays a role of a pressure cooker. Two lids prevent boiling over and gives adequate pressure. With a double lid, the Kamado-san achieves just that. When the rice starts to boil, the rate of steam leaving the inner lid is faster than the amount of steam leaving the outer lid and the inner lid has 2 holes, whilst the outer lid only has 1. This causes steam to accumulate in the compartment between the inner and outer lid, pushing the inner lid down and exerting pressure on the cooking rice.
In their busy lives it is typical for Japanese households to cook rice in an electric rice cooker. However I wanted to cook rice the original way and have wanted to have my own Kamado-san Donabe Rice Cooker for many years. I always thought there was something quite nostalgic about cooking rice in a donabe pot, but not only this it makes the rice taste even better! The first thing when buying any new donabe pot is to season the pot, this process is called “medome” you do this before your first use. I have a whole separate blog post about this.
Then you’re ready to cook delicious rice!
But first I wanted to make furikake for the onigiri I was going to make the first time I cooked rice in my brand new donabe pot.
Furikake ふりかけ is a dry japanese condiment sprinkled on top of cooked rice. I had just received my organic vegetable box with a bunch of carrots with their leaves still attached. Instead of throwing the leaves away I decided to make furikake with them.
にんじんの葉っぱのふり Furikake of carrot leaves:
First chop the stalks away from the leaf part and discard the stalks. Wash the leaves and pat dry with kitchen towel. Chop the leaves up finely and spread them out on some parchment paper on a baking sheet. Set your oven to low 50 degrees C and leave for one hour. Make sure they cook on a low heat you do not want them to burn only dry out. When they are dry, leave the leaves to cool then rub them between your fingers to create a finer powder. Add a few teaspoons of salt and some toasted sesame seeds and your furikake is ready to add to rice. Store in an air tight container.

Now back to my rice. 
It is important when cooking rice to wash it thoroughly in clean water until the water becomes clear.
After this put the rice in a sieve and leave to air for ten minutes before adding your rice to your donabe pot.
Add 2 rice cooker cups of Japanese rice and around  4 rice cooker cups of cold water into your donabe pot. The plastic rice cooker cup that comes with the rice cooker is 3/4 cup (180ml). In Japan, this amount is called ichi go (一合).
Leave the rice to soak in the water for at least 30 minutes. After this time place your inner lid onto your donabe and then place the outer lid ontop making sure the holes do not match up.
Put your burner on a medium heat and cook for around 10-15 minutes until steam starts to come through the hole on the outer lid. Then turn off your heat and leave to steam for 20 minutes.
After this time you can remove the lid and fluff up the rice.
I made Onigiri rice balls rolled in carrot leaf furikake and umeboshi paste in the centre.

Served with a simple meal of grilled seasonal vegetables and miso soup.

Itadakimasu 🙏🏻
( if you would like to know where I got my gorgeous Kamado-san Donabe Rice Cooker I got it from www.wagumi-j.com . I have spoken about this store in London’s OXO towers in a previous post. They sell a wide selection of Japanese crafts and design work by individual artists and regional craft producers in Japan.)