Tag

Tamari

Blog, Summer Food

Raw Taco Meat Inspired By Japan

I was inspired by Rawsouk ロースークKumagaya,Saitama Japan to make this raw taco meat. It makes a great alternative to using soy mince but is just as versatile and so tasty. Here is the recipe and lots of ideas of how to use it.

You will need 1/2 cup of walnuts and 1/2 a cup of mixed sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds soaked over night.

Drain the nuts and seeds and add these to a food processor. Add to this 1/4 red onion finely diced,1 tablespoon of lemon juice,1 teaspoon each of cayenne pepper,paprika and chilli powder,1 finely chopped eryngii mushroom or two or three normal mushrooms,1 tablespoon of nutritional yeast,a few slices of sindried tomato some salt and pepper and 1 tablespoon of tamari. Process all of this in short bursts scraping the sides until you get a nice mince consistency ( do not over process you don’t want a mush ).

This is your raw taco meat base.

Now you can use this for numerous meals what you have made should be enough for three meals.

The first is a raw zucchini noodle with raw mince ( to the mince just add tomato purée or pasata if you want more of a bolognese sauce). You could also add this to normal spaghetti.

Use your mince for burritos or as an ingredient in burrito bowls.

Raw romaine burrito or veggie wraps.

Japanese taco rice ( see taco rice recipe for more info on this)

What I love is a semi raw chilli bowl. It’s semi raw because the black and kidney beans are cooked. Just add beans,chopped red and green bell peppers,chopped zucchini, some chopped chillis and sweetcorn.

Serve with rice or cauliflower rice to keep it more raw,quacamole and salad.

I also think this could be used for a raw lasagne and Soboro don. How will you use yours?

 

 

Blog, Spring Food

Teriyaki Shiitake Sushi Burgers

I decided to make these delicious sushi burgers I made them quite small so they were almost like sliders. The difference between these and my rice burgers is that you use seasoned sushi rice and do not cook the rice on top in a pan.

First make your sushi rice and season the rice ( I like to use the Clearspring brand sushi seasoning it makes things really easy.)

Then decide how big you want to make them and choose a small bowl and place clingfilm wrap inside. Then put some rice into the bowl and press down making burger buns.

Then make your teriyaki shiitake. Slice up some shiitake mushrooms and sauté in a little toasted sesame oil. Make your teriyaki sauce I used tamari,mirin and maple syrup. Add this to your mushrooms and reduce down.

After you have made all your tops and bottoms you can fill your sushi burgers. I first spread some vegan kewpie mayo on the bottom of the rice then added sliced cucumber then lettuce,red pickled cabbage,sliced avocado and a square of toasted nori, then I added the teriyaki shiitake mushrooms. Topping it with another burger rice bun a sprinkle of black sesame seeds and some dried kombu. I served these with soy sauce,pickled ginger and wasabi.

Perfect for a Hanami picnic or for entertaining guests.

Continue reading…

Blog

Toshikoshi Soba ( Year End Soba noodles )

On New Year’s Eve ( oh-misoka ) some Japanese people like to eat Toshikoshi Soba. Toshikoshi means end the old year and enter the new year.
A hot bowl of buckwheat noodles eaten to symbolise good luck for the new year a head and it is also said to let go of hardships from the year.
I made a simple kombu dashi with shiitake,mirin and tamari and had this with my buckwheat noodles and topped it with aburaage ( fried tofu ) chopped green onion and yuzu peel.
Minasama shin-nen akemashite ometetou gozaimasu ( happy new year to everyone)

皆様、新年あけましておめでとうございます!

Winter Food

Steamfried Brussels Sprouts with miso

Brussels sprouts are the perfect winter seasonal vegetable.

These panfried ones have lots of flavour start by cutting each Brussels sprout in half . Add a little oil to a hot pan and sear the flat side . Meanwhile make a sauce with 240ml of veg stock,1/2 tablespoon of grated ginger,2 tablespoon of mirin,1tablespoon soy sauce and four tablespoon of white miso paste and whisk.

The amount of sauce you need depends of how many Brussels you have so use your judgement.

Pour the sauce into the pan and cover to steam the Brussels sprouts. Then add shimeji mushrooms and crumbled yuba ( if you can’t get yuba you could maybe add some crumbled tofu)

Finally before serving add some yuzu rind (or lemon) and a sprinkle of sesame seeds.

Lovely served on rice .

 

Blog, Winter Food

Damako Nabe ( Rice ball Hot Pot )

From the mountainous  region of Tohoku comes this local dish which is perfect for cold winter days.

After cooking your rice mash it and then sprinkle with potato starch and roll into balls then set aside.

Use a dashi stock for the broth I always like to make one in advance with kombu kelp and dried shiitake. Just place them in water for a few hours then take them out and add mirin and tamari.

The vegetables I used were leek,taro,carrot,mixed mushrooms spring onion,nappa cabbage,komatsuna and daikon radish.

Place your vegetables in your donabe pot with your dashi stock except the leafy greens.

Then simmer your vegetables and add your rice balls the rice balls soak up all the lovely juices.

You could also add tofu or yuba if you wanted.

If you do not have a donabe pot you could steam your vegetables or add them to a cooking pot.

Finely add your leafy greens when everything else is tender and a sprinkle of shichimi pepper.

A hot, healthy,cosy dish for a cold winter evening.

 

Blog, Winter Food

Bifun Soup

As the weather is turning considerably colder I find myself craving soups, stews and nabe ( hot pots ). This one is especially good for keeping those colds at bay with warming ginger and spices.

First I made a stock I used one litre of vegetable stock in a pan and I added to that a tablespoon of tamari,some sliced ginger,half an onion cut into four large pieces,a star anise and half a stick of cinnamon. I put this on a gentle simmmer for about 20mins.

In the mean time I pan seared some tofu and sautéed some shiitake mushrooms. I steamed some broccoli,komatsuna,baby corn,snap peas and bean sprouts. Chopped some mint,coriander basil and sliced a red chilli pepper.

I then cooked my bifun ( rice vermicelli noodles) for a few mins and then drained them in cold water to stop them from cooking further.

Then I drained the liquid on the broth and discarded the rest.

I placed the noodles in a bowl added my stock and the rest of the toppings. Finally I added a wedge of lime,chilli oil,a teaspoon of smooth peanut butter and a sprinkle of sesame seeds.

 

Autumn Food, Blog

Miso baked beans on toast

After having my own retail shop for over 18 years a few weeks ago I ended up having to close. After a few weeks of being slightly lost I decided to start doing a market stall . The weather was so cold that all I wanted was a hot quick comforting meal. Everyone loves beans on toast so I decided to make my own using cannellini (navy beans) .

Heat a little oil and sauté some finely chopped onion until soft ( I used one large shallot then add one tablespoon of tomato purée,one cup of organic pasata,one tablespoon of tamari,a teaspoon of chipotle powder or smoked paprika,a sprinkle of dried thyme and a teaspoon of coconut palm sugar. Give this a stir then add a cup of drained and rinsed cannellini beans and a heaped  teaspoon of sweet miso paste.

Heat until hot and spoon on to fresh toast. Add some fresh black pepper and maybe some grated melted vegan cheese if you like ( you could place this under the grill to melt )

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Autumn Food, Blog

Kenchinjiru

Kenchinjiru is a hearty warming soup which originates from the Kencho-ji temple in Kamakura. This is my version of this Shojin Ryori Zen Buddhist dish. Full of root vegetables and crumbled tofu in a kombu,shiitake,tamari and miso broth.

Soak one piece of Kombu kelp and two dried shiitake mushrooms in a 1 litre jug of hot water. Leave for a few hours then discard the kombu and slice the shiitake for later.

Add some toasted sesame oil to a pan and sauté your root vegetables I used :lotus root,gobo ( burdock),carrot and daikon radish. Then add your dashi stock. Then add some crumbled tofu a tablespoon of tamari and mirin and shiitake and simmer until all the vegetables are cooked.

Ladle a cup of stock and dissolve one heaped tablespoon of miso and add to the soup. Do not boil the soup as this will destroy the enzymes of the miso.

Just before serving add any leafy green vegetables I used komatsuna and also snap peas.

Serve in a deep bowl and garnish with some sansho pepper to schichimi togarashi .

A wonder winter warmer.

 

Autumn Food, Blog

Kabocha & Chestnut Loaf

Its definitely getting to that time of year again when the leaves start to turn and the weather is chilly. I especially like this time of year for pumpkin and squash  season . My favourites being kabocha and kuri . These both have a lovely texture and nutty flavour and are so versatile they can be roasted or steamed and have many health benefits being  high in beta-carotene and vitamin A . These are prized in Japan and are a staple food come autumn. I’m sure cooking with these will become a firm favourite if you haven’t already.

In this recipe I decided to steam half a kabocha pumpkin and scoop out the soft flesh to combine it with ingredients to make a chestnut and pumpkin loaf .

So steam your pumpkin first and cook up a cup of short grain brown rice ready to add later.

Finely chop half an onion,a small carrot,a stick of celery, a large shiitake mushroom or a few small ones and around six already cooked and peeled roast chestnuts. I buy mine already done . In the U.K. They are by a company called Merchant Gourmet.

Add to a pan some coconut butter and sauté these ingredients. Then add a tablespoon of tamari,Worcestershire sauce,miso and tomato purée and mix in then add your mashed steamed pumpkin and finally some chopped kale or you could use spinach and a cup of cooked rice.

Add a cup of gluten free oat flour to a bowl and add to this your kabocha ingredients and give it a good mix .

Line a loaf tin with parchment paper and spoon in your ingredients.

Bake in a moderate oven until cooked through around 30-45 mins.

Turn out on to a wire rack to cool completely before cutting in to slices.

I think this could also be a good mixture for kabocha burgers instead of adding the mixture to a baking tin just make into individual burger patties and bake or fry them .

The slices can be a nice alternative for maybe a thanksgiving or Christmas dinner and could also be nice cold in a wrap for instance.

I decided to make a comforting dinner with creamy mashed potatoes and shiitake miso gravy.

Blog, Summer Food

Baked Tomatoes With Spicy Soy Mince

First slice the tops off your tomatoes then scoop out the insides.

I used Clearspring organic soy mince which is dry so you just add a little hot water to it and leave it to soak for 10 mins. While that’s soaking sauté some finely chopped onion and shiitake mushrooms in a little coconut butter then add your soy mince with a splash of vegan Worcestershire sauce and tamari. I like to spice mine up with some shichimi spice you could add chilli powder or cayenne pepper if you don’t have it.

Next fill your tomatoes with the mixture.

Top with panko bread crumbs and vegan cheese and bake in a hot oven until the tomatoes are soft and the cheese is melted.

Top with chopped basil

I served mine with a buckwheat pasta and salad

How will you serve yours?

 

Blog, Summer Food

Vegan Kabayaki Bowl (mock eel)

Around this time of year in July there is a tradition in  Japan called Doyo-no-Ushi-no-hi. It falls this year on the 25th of July 2017. This is a day when some people eat eel . (Unagi) It is said that eel helps with the summer heat. Well I don’t know about that but I thought I would make a vegan version of this dish using eggplant . This mock eel dish doesn’t look particularly pretty but then neither does a dead eel and I’d much rather eat an eggplant .

First of all prick your eggplant with a toothpick to stop it exploding in the oven when baking and score around the top of the egg plant this will help when peeling off the skin.

Bake in the oven until tender. Take out the oven and when it’s cool enough to handles strip off the skin. Cut down the eggplant but leave a little bit attached at the top so it fans out into two halves.

Then make your kabayaki sauce using two tablespoons of  tamari or soy sauce two tablespoons of mirin  and a teaspoon of unrefined sugar.

Add this to a pan and put the egg plant into the pan cook and then flip over to coat both sides and let the eggplant soak up the sauce. Then cut some nori and add this to one side of your egg plant and place under the grill to make a crispy skin.

Serve this on rice mixed with gomashio ( a dry condiment like furikake made of sesame seeds and salt) topped with a sprinkle of sesame seeds,sansho pepper and chopped onion or chives.

I think you will agree it may not be eel but a lot more ethically friendly.

Blog, Summer Food

Vegan Tekka Don (tuna bowl)

Tekka don is a rice bowl dish topped with raw marinated tuna sashimi.

I wanted to make a refreshing but vegan friendly version of this dish and this is what I came up with.

You will need three large firm tomatoes cut a small cross section on the bottom of each tomato and drop into a pan of boiling water. To cook the tomato doesn’t take long you will know they are done when the skin starts to peel. Plunge the tomato into cold water to cool and then peel off the skin from the cross section you cut into the tomato.

When the tomatoes are peeled cut them into quarters discarding the seed part.

Make a marinade of tamari,lime juice and mirin ( around two tablespoons of each ) you can add some shichimi spice pepper if you like. Coat the tomatoes in the marinade and chill in the fridge

when you want to serve your Tekka Don wash and cook some sushi rice in your rice cooker and when your rice is done place into the bottom of a bowl.

Top the warm rice with the marinated tomato chopped green onion a sprinkle of sesame seeds sliced lettuce  kizaminori ( shredded nori) and angel hair chilli threads if you can get them they are called Ito togarashi if you live in the U.K. You can get them from www.souschef.co.uk

Blog, Summer Food

Yuzu Battered Tofu & Sticky Orange Sauce

After seeing Marc Matsumoto create an orange chicken on Instagram I was inspired to go out and make a vegan version of my own.

Before starting make up some rice in your rice cooker and leave it on warm ready for later.

First I decided to use my yuzu battered tofu for this but you could just as easily use baked tofu or just plain if you prefer.

To make my yuzu battered tofu all you need is a block of tofu that has been drained and cut into large cubes. Then in a bowl add three tablespoons of plain or rice flour one tablespoon of yuzu juice and eight tablespoons of water. Mix together to form a thick batter. Coat your cubes in the batter then heat some coconut butter and shallow fry the coated tofu . Then drain on kitchen paper.
To make the sauce is as follows:
Use a zester to zest the peel off an orange and put the peel in a pan then slice the orange in half and juice the orange and add the juice to the pan with the zest. Next add one tablespoon of brown rice vinegar,one teaspoon of tamari,one teaspoon of coconut palm sugar,one tablespoon of grated ginger using a Japanese ginger grater if possible,half a teaspoon of chilli flakes and one tablespoon of orange marmalade give it a stir and start to heat up the sauce. Make a slurry of kuzu starch by adding one teaspoon of kuzu and half a teaspoon of water to a small bowl and mix then add this to your sauce. Turn up the heat a little and let it simmer until the sauce is all nice and sticky and thick. Then drop in your battered tofu and give it all a good coating.
Serve with rice and maybe add some chopped red chilli or green onion to garnish and a sprinkle of sesame seeds.

(I also think maybe adding some sliced bell peppers to this would also be nice just cook them up in the sauce before adding the tofu)